Friday, November 9, 2012

Accepting applications for Associate Professor at Penn State--African American Studies

Associate Professor of Black Feminist Thought, Gender and Sexuality Studies, or Queer/LGBT Studies

Department: African American Studies

 

The Pennsylvania State University, College of the Liberal Arts, invites applications for a tenure-stream position in Black Feminist Thought and Theory, Gender and Sexuality Studies, or Queer/LGBT Studies for its new Department of African American Studies.  The position is to be filled at the rank of associate professor.  Applicants should have demonstrable teaching experience and scholarly credentials commensurate with an associate professor appointment at a major research university. While we seek to hire an established scholar in the areas indicated above, we will consider applications from other disciplines in the broader field of African American Studies, including cultural and social anthropology, political economy, sociology, history, philosophy, and cultural geography. We particularly welcome applications from scholars with demonstrable expertise in the digital humanities.

 

The salary/benefit package is competitive, and the position begins in fall 2013. Applications for the position must be submitted electronically to: www.la.psu.edu/facultysearch/. The on-line application must include a cover letter and curriculum vitae. Please arrange to have three confidential letters of reference sent to Staci Kelly at szk3@psu.edu. If the application and letters of reference cannot be submitted electronically, they may be mailed to Search Committee Chair, AFAM Search Committee, The Pennsylvania State University, 133 Willard Building, University Park, PA 16802. Applications received by November 15, 2012 will receive first priority, although all applications will be considered until the search is concluded. For additional information contact Staci Kelly at szk3@psu.edu. Employment will require successful completion of background check(s) in accordance with University policies. Penn State is committed to affirmative action, equal opportunity and the diversity of its workforce.

Accepting applications for Assistant Professor at Penn State--African American Studies

Assistant Professor of African American Studies

Department: African American Studies

 

The Pennsylvania State University, College of the Liberal Arts, invites applications for a tenure-stream position in its new Department of African American Studies. The position is to be filled at the rank of assistant professor. Applicants should have demonstrable teaching experience or potential and scholarly credentials commensurate with a tenure-stream appointment at a major research university. While we welcome applications from scholars across all the relevant areas of specialization and competence, we particularly encourage applications from scholars with doctorates in African American or Black Diaspora Studies, with research emphases in Black Feminist Thought and Theory and/or political economy, and with demonstrable expertise in the digital humanities. We also welcome applicants with degrees in humanistic disciplines including but not limited to cultural and social anthropology, comparative literature, sociology, philosophy, and cultural geography.

  

The salary/benefit package is competitive, and the position begins in fall 2013. Applications for the position must be submitted electronically to: www.la.psu.edu/facultysearch/. The on-line application must include a cover letter, curriculum vitae, and teaching portfolio. Please arrange to have three confidential reference letters sent to Staci Kelly at szk3@psu.edu. If the application and letters of reference cannot be submitted electronically, they may be mailed to Search Committee Chair, AFAM Search Committee, The Pennsylvania State University, 133 Willard Building, University Park, PA 16802. Applications received by November 15, 2012 will receive first priority, although all applications will be considered until the search is concluded. For additional information contact Staci Kelly at szk3@psu.edu. Employment will require successful completion of background check(s) in accordance with University policies. Penn State is committed to affirmative action, equal opportunity and the diversity of its workforce.

Assistant or Associate Professor of Women's Studies, Penn State

Assistant or Associate Professor of Women’s Studies

Department: Women’s Studies

 

The Department of Women’s Studies at The Pennsylvania State University invites applications for a position in Feminist Theory and Women’s Health, at the assistant or associate rank.  This position requires a scholar whose research on Women’s Health incorporates theoretical perspectives on one or more of the following areas: gender and sexuality; global health; reproductive rights and access; disability studies; environmental justice. 

 

Given this department’s consistent, top-ranked position among Women’s Studies programs in the United States, the ideal candidate should present a dynamic feminist research and publication agenda.  The successful candidate is expected to publish in high-quality venues, to teach graduate and undergraduate courses in both feminist theory and women’s health, and is encouraged to seek external funding.  Tenure will be granted in the Department of Women’s Studies, but a joint appointment is possible. Penn State has vibrant programs in bioethics and medical humanities (at the University Park and Hershey campuses) and disability studies, as well as research centers such as the Social Science Research Institute, and the Children, Youth, and Families Consortium, and the Rock Ethics Institute.

 

The salary/benefit package is competitive, and the position begins in fall, 2013.

Applications for the position must be submitted electronically to: www.la.psu.edu/facultysearch/.  The on-line application must include a cover letter, CV, and a writing sample or representative publication. Please arrange to have three confidential letters of reference sent to Staci Kelly at szk3@psu.edu. If the application and letters of reference cannot be submitted electronically, they may be mailed to Search Committee Chair, Women’s Studies Search Committee, The Pennsylvania State University, 133 Willard Building, University Park, PA 16802. Applications received by December 1, 2012 will receive first priority, although all applications will be considered until the search is concluded. For additional information contact Staci Kelly at szk3@psu.edu. Employment will require successful completion of background check(s) in accordance with University policies. Penn State is committed to affirmative action, equal opportunity and the diversity of its workplace.

 

 

 


Accepting applications for Assistant/Associate Professor at Penn State, African Studies

Assistant/Associate Professor of Political Economy of African Development 

African Studies Program and the Department of Political Science

The African Studies Program and the Department of Political Science invite applications for a position in the Political Economy of African Development. Areas of emphasis include, but are not limited to post- colonial political economy, human rights, health, the environment, extractive industries and energy.  This position is part of a college-wide initiative to enhance African Studies at The Pennsylvania State University and strengthening intellectual ties between the Department of Political Science and the newly-created African Studies Program.  We expect to make an appointment at the rank of assistant or associate professor.  Candidates will be expected to teach undergraduate or graduate courses in African Studies and Political Science; and to contribute strongly to the development of the African Studies Program. Candidates should have the potential to publish in high-quality venues and to win external funding, have good teaching credentials, and a mastery of research methods.   Candidates must have their Ph.D. in hand by August 15 2013. Faculty positions at Penn State involve substantial research support; in addition, junior positions offer significant release time. 


The salary/benefit package is competitive, and the position begins in the fall 2013. Applications received by November 15, 2012, will receive first consideration; but applications will be reviewed until the position is filled.  Electronic submission strongly preferred. Submit a cover letter explaining your research and teaching experience, current CV, samples of scholarly writing and teaching evaluations (with a key) to: 
www.la.psu.edu/facultysearch/. Candidates with fewer than four years since completion of the Ph.D. should also send an official graduate transcript. Please arrange to have three confidential letters of reference sent to Marie Carlson at mdc16@psu.edu. If the application and letters of reference cannot be submitted electronically, they may be mailed to Search Committee Chair, African Studies Program, The Pennsylvania State University, 133 Willard Building, University Park, PA 16802. For additional information contact Marie Carlson at mdc16@psu.edu. Employment will require successful completion of background check(s) in accordance with University policies. Penn State is committed to affirmative action, equal opportunity and the diversity of its workforce.

CFP: International Conference "Images of Terror, Narratives of (In)security: Literary, Artistic and Cultural Responses"

International Conference

Images of Terror, Narratives of (In)security:
Literary, Artistic and Cultural Responses

CALL FOR PAPERS AND PANELS:  20th November

23rd and 24th April 2013
University of Lisbon



One of the greatest paradoxes of the 21st century is the fact that, even though western societies have reached an outstanding scientific and technological development, fear and insecurity continue to be very much alive in public discourse as well as in our private life. Concerns about terrorism, urban criminality, global epidemics, computer piracy and organized crime and, more recently, about the outcomes of the financial and economic crises circulate widely in the media and their highly politicized representations shape much of our everyday life.


Since the launching of the "war on terror" in the wake of the September 11th attacks, anxieties about security have grown intensively, justifying the strengthening of security policies and practices, not only in the US but all over the world. Despite this trend, other less "spectacular" forms of terror continue to have actual repercussions in our lives. In fact, a survey by the European Commission (released in November 2011) found that 34% percent of Europeans consider the financial situation rather than so-called "terrorism as the biggest threat to European security.
To what extent are many of these (in)securities real, exaggerated or constructed? What explains the disparate amount of attention paid to different sources of insecurity? Why do certain forms of "terror" achieve the status of "spectacles" and "memorable events", while others receive comparatively little attention by the media and popular discourse?


In this conference we aim to examine how literature, art and culture have dealt with notions of insecurity and to what extent they have provided significant challenges and responses to hegemonic discourses.
Participants are encouraged to examine notions of insecurity from a wide variety of disciplinary perspectives. Issues to be discussed might include, but are not limited to:

-    Philosophical approaches to (in)security
-    Literary approaches to (in)security
-    Psychoanalytic approaches to (in)security
-    Politics of (in)security
-    The relation between insecurity and art
-    Insecurities associated with economic/financial crisis
-    (In)securities in Visual Culture
-    Representations of the "War on Terror"
-    Critical readings of "9/11" novels/films
-    Representations of the terrorist attacks in London and/or Madrid
-    Urban (in)securities and their representations
-    Depictions of the Arab Spring
-    The role of the media in the construction and/or dissemination of (in)securities
-    The role of technology in the construction and/or dissemination of (in)securities



Confirmed Guest Speakers:
Professor Liam Kennedy (University College Dublin, Ireland)
Professor David Murakami Wood (Queen's University, Canada)
Professor Kristiaan Versluys (Ghent University, Belgium)


---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


We are accepting proposals for:
•    individual proposals for a 20-minute paper
•    joint proposals for thematic panels consisting of 3 papers (20 minutes each)

Please include the following information in your proposal:
a)    the full title of your paper / of your panel and respective papers;
b)    abstract (ca. 200 words per paper);
c)    your name;
d)    your institutional affiliation;
e)    your e-mail and postal address;
f)    a short biographical note (ca. 100 words).

Please submit your abstract and inquiries to:
conferencecilm2013@gmail.com (subject header: abstract proposal)

Deadline for proposals: 20 November 2012
Notification of acceptance: 12 December 2012

Selected papers delivered at the Conference will be eligible for publication.
Working languages: English and Portuguese



For more information please check:
http://www.cilm.comparatistas.edu.pt/index.php/news/75-images-of-terror-narratives-of-insecurity-literary-artistic-and-cultural-responses-call-for-papers.html

Thursday, November 8, 2012

2012 Survey on eIdentification (SSEDIC)

Each of us uses an eID on daily basis, e.g. when signing in to an email account, Facebook profile, Internet banking, or to access services of public authorities. For such online transactions, we need to identify and authenticate ourselves. Currently, various types of hardware and software are used for this purpose, with varying levels of security. More than ever before, this confronts us with questions about privacy protection when sending personal information over the Internet. All these issues are the subject of this survey for which your attention and collaboration is required. This survey is organized by SSEDIC, a EU-supported research group that advises the European Commission in defining its policy on Electronic Identity for the coming years. A summary of the results will be made public via our website: www.eid-ssedic.eu



via http://ec.europa.eu/information_society/newsroom/cf/dae/itemdetail.cfm?item_id=8918

Wednesday, November 7, 2012

ICA Preconference: Beyond the Brand


INTERNATIONAL COMMUNICATION ASSOCIATION – POPULAR COMMUNICATION DIVISION
PRECONFERENCE ANNOUNCEMENT 
BEYOND THE BRAND
http://beyondthebrand2013.wordpress.com/
17 June 2013, 8AM – 4:30PM
London School of Economics
 
Organizers: Devon Powers, Drexel University and Melissa Aronczyk, Carleton University
Keynote Address: Don Slater, London School of Economics
Confirmed Senior Scholar Participants
Sarah Banet-Weiser, University of Southern California
Aeron Davis, Goldsmiths, University of London
Alison Hearn, University of Western Ontario
Matt McAllister, Pennsylvania State University
Liz Moor, Goldsmiths, University of London
Joe Turow, University of Pennsylvania
 
BEYOND THE BRAND
A vital shift in contemporary communication is related to the ways in which interpersonal and public communication have been (re)located and transformed in increasingly promotional contexts. One index of this transformation is the ubiquity, polyvalence, and assumptions of branding. The "work" of the brand is to act at once as representation and object, communication and control, market and media.

As concept, metaphor, technology and communicative logic, brands are part popular culture and part commerce, part personal and part collective, part rationality and part affect. They appear to be everywhere even as they effectively seek to hide their origins.

What resources do scholars have to get "beyond the brand"? How can we come up with more effective and trenchant definitions and analytical tools to overcome brands' seeming ubiquity, and to defuse the apparent power of branding in language and in practice? The goal of this preconference is to develop resources and strategies in four thematic areas: brands and methods/critique; brands, knowledge, and surveillance; brands and communities of resistance (locally and transnationally); and brands and industrial/institutional change.


WORKING GROUPS
Participants in this one-day preconference should plan to take part in one of four working groups:

1. Brands and Scholarly Methods/Critique
2. Brands and Communities of Resistance, Locally and Transnationally
3. Brands, Knowledge and Surveillance
4. Industrial and Institutional Change in Brand Environments
 
For details about each of these working groups, see beyondthebrand2013.wordpress.com



HOW TO APPLY

Interested applicants should submit a 350-500 word abstract detailing the relationship to their work to one of the above working areas. Submit abstracts to beyondthebrand2013@gmail.com before 1 February 2013. Accepted participants will be notified by March 1, 2013.

We encourage applications from graduate students. Four graduate students will be selected to serve as editorial assistants, charged with the task of writing an analytic summary of the working group proceedings.

The preconference fee for participants is £47/$75. A limited number of fee waivers are available for scholars from low-income countries and graduate students.

Please direct queries and requests for information to beyondthebrand2013@gmail.com

CFP Ray Browne Conference

Ray Browne Conference on Popular Culture "Modes of Mobility: Popular Culture in an Age of Technology"

February 8 – February 10, 2013
Bowling Green State University
Bowling Green, Ohio
http://bgsu.orgsync.com/org/pcsa/conference

To build on the success of the First Annual Ray Browne Conference, and usher in the fortieth year of the Popular Culture Department at Bowling Green State University, the Popular Culture Scholars Association at BGSU would like to invite any and all students (undergraduates and graduate), scholars, critics, former members of the POPC program and friends of the department to join us for the Ray Browne Conference on Popular Culture to be held February 8th through February 10th 2013, on the campus of Bowling Green State University.

Dr. Ray Browne founded the department of Popular Culture to give students an opportunity to academically consider the cultural forms of their everyday lives. In the past forty years, popular culture has only grown more prominent in society and developed new ways of engaging the public. Popular culture has become increasingly mobile through smart phones, webisodes, memes, and social media blurring the boundaries between producers and consumers. Simultaneously, cultures in general have become increasingly mobile through the spread of and contact between peoples, ideas and technology; making the production and consumption of culture a truly transnational affair. In light of increased cultural mobility made possible by new modes of technology, we must consider how popular culture scholarship has grown (and can continue to grow) to accommodate such new cultural modalities.

Potential topics for papers, panels, and roundtable proposals include, but are not limited to:

• How has the increased mobility in terms of culture, people, and technology had an effect on appropriation of cultures, (anti)nationalism, social and political change, tourism, diasporic experiences and how do we begin to theorize these interactions?
• How do we reimagine/reconstruct literatures, languages, narratives and identities in cyber societies? Has transmedia and convergence culture shaped our interaction with popular texts and affected pop cultural narratives?
• How has new media shaped interactions between popular culture and individuals?
• With increasing shifts in culture, have there been similar shifts in the representation of disabled, gender, sexual, race, and ethnic identities?
• Which new media, texts, genres, etc. deserve attention from academics and scholars?
• How have these shifts altered the study popular culture, and how do we continue to explore them?
• Explorations of specific popular culture texts, genres, trends and approaches

The deadline for proposals is Friday, November 16, 2012. Individual paper proposals should be between 300-400 words. Full roundtable and panel theme proposals can be longer, but should include as much prospective information about the topic and number of possible participants as possible. Please email your abstract and a short biography to bgpcsa@gmail.com. The subject line should contain the writer's surname followed by "BCPC13" Abstract. Notifications for decisions will be sent by Friday, December 15, 2012. Please contact PCSA if you have any questions or concerns at bgpcsa@gmail.com or via our website at bgsu.orgsync.com/org/pcsa.

Deadline: November 16, 2012

Position Announcement: Communication Studies (Communication and Health)

Assistant Professor –  Communication Studies (Communication and Health)

 
 
The Communication Studies Program of the School of Journalism and Communication at Carleton University invites applications from qualified candidates for a preliminary [tenure-track] position at the rank of Assistant Professor in the beginning July 1, 2013. 
 
Candidates must possess a Ph.D. in Communication or a cognate discipline. Candidates will have demonstrated excellence in teaching and a commitment to research and scholarship. Successful candidates will be able to participate effectively in both undergraduate and graduate teaching and supervision, as well as demonstrate a long-term research program. 
 
The Communication Studies Program is seeking candidates who can demonstrate teaching experience and research expertise in the area of Communication and Health. Health is one of Carleton University's four interdisciplinary strategic themes and an area of considerable research strength. Applicants who also have expertise in one of the other three strategic areas, and/or ability to teach methods courses will be given particular consideration. The other strategic themes are: New Digital Media, Global Identities and Globalization, and Sustainability and the Environment. 
 
The Communication Studies Program offers degrees at undergraduate, master's and doctoral levels, and has a combined enrolment of over 1,000 students. It is a leader in the study of communication theory, research and policy, having offered undergraduate degrees since 1979, and is seeking individuals of exceptional abilities to augment its strengths in teaching and scholarship. Further information on the program is available at http://www1.carleton.ca/communication 
 
Please send complete applications to Professor Eileen Saunders, Associate Director, School of Journalism and Communication, Carleton University, 1125 Colonel By Drive, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, K1S 5B6. Application packages should be sent in hard copy and will consist of a cover letter, a current curriculum vitae, copies of sample publications, a statement of research achievements and research plan, evidence of teaching performance, and sample syllabi. Applicants should also arrange for three letters of reference to be sent directly to the Associate Director. The closing date for applications is January 7, 2013.
 
Located in Ottawa, Ontario, Carleton University is a dynamic research and teaching institution with a tradition of leading change. Its internationally recognized faculty, staff, and researchers provide more than 26,000 full- and part-time students from every province and more than 100 countries around the world with academic opportunities in more than 80 programs of study. Carleton's creative, interdisciplinary, and international approach to research has led to many significant discoveries and creative work in science and technology, business, public policy and administration, and the arts. 
 
Minutes from downtown, Carleton University is located on a beautiful campus in the central portion of Ottawa, bordered by the Rideau River on one side, and the Rideau Canal on the other. With over 12 national museums and the spectacular Gatineau Park close by, there are many excellent recreational opportunities for individuals and families to enjoy. The City of Ottawa itself, with a population of almost one million, is Canada's capital city and reflects the country's bilingual and multicultural character. Carleton's location in the nation's capital provides many opportunities for research with groups and institutions that reflect the diversity of the country. 
 
Carleton University is strongly committed to fostering diversity within its community as a source of excellence, cultural enrichment, and social strength. We welcome those who would contribute to the further diversification of our faculty and its scholarship including, but not limited to, women, visible minorities, Aboriginal peoples, persons with disabilities, and persons of any sexual orientation or gender identity. 
 
All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply. Canadians and permanent residents will be given priority. 
 
All positions are subject to budgetary approval.
 
For more information, visit: http://www1.carleton.ca/sjc/careers/

Position Announcement Communication Studies (Digital Media, Civic Culture, Global Change)

Tier 2 Canada Research Chair – Communication Studies (Digital Media, Civic Culture and Global Change)

 
 
The Communication Studies Program of the School of Journalism and Communication at Carleton University invites applications for nomination for a Tier 2 Canada Research Chair on Digital Media, Civic Culture and Global Change. 
 
The nominee for the CRC will be an emerging scholar with teaching experience and research expertise on the role of digital media in transforming global politics and the affordances of digital media for new social movements. The successful applicant will have a stellar research record on the use of digital media by civil society actors and the transformation of global movements for change as a consequence of new media strategies. Candidates will possess a Ph.D. in Communication or a cognate discipline and be able to participate effectively in teaching and graduate supervision in the field of digital media, civic culture and global change. 
 
Academic rank and salary will be commensurate with qualifications and experience. The successful applicant will work with faculty and staff to submit a CRC application for the April 2013 competition, with an anticipated start date of January 1, 2014. Tier 2 CRCs are typically awarded to excellent emerging researchers who have demonstrated particular research creativity and the potential to achieve international recognition in their fields in the next five to 10 years. 
 
Digital and social media lie at the intersection of many areas of academic study, research and production at Carleton University. As articulated in the university's strategic plan, Defining Dreams, there are both teaching and research initiatives on new digital media underway in an impressive range of disciplines, from exploring the nature and potential of the 'Digital Humanities', to computer animation and design through the Interactive Multimedia and Design program, to industrial and technical drawing, to the effect of computer design for user interface. The CRC in Digital Media, Civic Culture and Global Change would add an important component to this mix with its focus on the link between digital media and changing citizen expectations and civic practices. The incumbent of the Chair will be in a unique position to forge a collaborative research network and facilitate cross-disciplinary research across the Faculty of Public Affairs and outside the university with organizations in the civic sector. Taking advantage of the facilities in the Communication Research Centre in the new River Building, the Chair will be a catalyzing focus of a high public profile in digital and social media research around questions of civic culture and global change. The Communication Studies Program offers degrees at undergraduate, master's and doctoral levels, and has a combined enrolment of over 1,000 students. It is a leader in the study of communication theory, research and policy, having offered undergraduate degrees since 1979, and is seeking individuals of exceptional abilities to augment its strengths in research and teaching. Further information on the program is available at http://www1.carleton.ca/communication 
 
Please send complete applications to Professor Eileen Saunders, Associate Director, School of Journalism and Communication, Carleton University, 1125 Colonel By Drive, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, K1S 5B6. Application packages should be sent in hard copy and will consist of a curriculum vitae, copies of sample publications, a statement of teaching and research interests, and a one-page description of the applicant's expected fit to Carleton University's Strategic Research Priorities. Further information on these is available at http://www1.carleton.ca/research/ccms/wp-content/ccms-files/Carleton_SRP_SUMMARY.pdf 
Applicants should also arrange for three letters of reference to be sent directly to the Associate Director. The closing date for applications is January 7, 2013. 
 
Located in Ottawa, Ontario, Carleton University is a dynamic research and teaching institution with a tradition of leading change. Its internationally recognized faculty, staff, and researchers provide more than 26,000 full- and part-time students from every province and more than 100 countries around the world with academic opportunities in more than 80 programs of study. Carleton's creative, interdisciplinary, and international approach to research has led to many significant discoveries and creative work in science and technology, business, public policy and administration, and the arts. 
 
Minutes from downtown, Carleton University is located on a beautiful campus in the central portion of Ottawa, bordered by the Rideau River on one side, and the Rideau Canal on the other. With over 12 national museums and the spectacular Gatineau Park close by, there are many excellent recreational opportunities for individuals and families to enjoy. The City of Ottawa itself, with a population of almost one million, is Canada's capital city and reflects the country's bilingual and multicultural character. Carleton's location in the nation's capital provides many opportunities for research with groups and institutions that reflect the diversity of the country. 
 
Carleton University is strongly committed to fostering diversity within its community as a source of excellence, cultural enrichment, and social strength. We welcome those who would contribute to the further diversification of our faculty and its scholarship including, but not limited to, women, visible minorities, Aboriginal peoples, persons with disabilities, and persons of any sexual orientation or gender identity. 
 
All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply. Canadians and permanent residents will be given priority. 
 
All positions are subject to budgetary approval. 
 
For more information, visit: http://www1.carleton.ca/sjc/careers/

UPDATE: CFP: Computer Culture (SW/TX PCA/ACA Conference, February 13-16, 2013)

Computer Culture: Call for Papers
Southwest/Texas Popular Culture and American Culture Association


February 13-16, 2013

Albuquerque, New Mexico

http://www.swtxpca.org
Proposal submission deadline: November 16, 2012

Conference hotel: Hyatt Regency Hotel & Conference Center

330 Tijeras Ave NW
Albuquerque, NM 87102

Phone: +1 505 842 1234


    Computer Culture: Call for Papers

    We are accepting papers and forming panels for the area of Computer Culture, as one of the many areas within the 34th annual conference of the Southwest/Texas Popular Culture Association / American Culture Association (SW/TX PCA/ACA).
    
    Computer is broadly defined as any computational device, whether smartphone or abacus, and any form of information technology, including the origins of concepts of interactive text which may predate computational devices as traditionally conceived.
    
    Culture is rooted in the concept of cultural meaning. We ask not just operational questions such as, "How do people communicate using computers?" but questions of meaning such as, "What does it mean when people communicate using computers instead of using pre-computer approaches to communication?"
    
    "Computer Culture" can be understood in a variety of ways:
      - the culture of the computer, that is, as computers interact with each other, what culture do they have of their own?
      - the culture around the computer, that is, (sub)cultures associated with the production, maintenance, use, and destruction of computers
      - the culture through the computer, that is, explicit treatment of how computer mediation influences cultural phenomena that exist or has existed in forms that did not involve computer mediation, and what these influences mean
      - the culture by the computer, that is, the ways in which new (sub)cultures or (sub)cultural phenomena have arisen because of computers and understandings of these given awareness of the nature and/or workings of computers
    
    Example questions associated with Computer Culture would include, but not be limited to:
    
     * What implications are there because of the powerfulness of (computer/information) technology ___ and are these implications beneficial, detrimental, inevitable, or avoidable?
    
     * What are the cultural origins of computers, computer/information technologies, and practices (such as ____ ) associated with them? What is the descriptive and prescriptive outlook for the conditions of those cultural forces associated with those cultural origins?
    
     * How do cultural forces (such as changes from one generation to the next, trends in education or society, or other cultural phenomena) impact (and are impacted by) computer/information technologies/market-forces, and what do these impacts (in either direction or both) mean?
    
    Paper topics might include (but are not limited to) those that address:
    - issues of (re)presentation through computers (Web site analysis and design),
    - methods of discourse involving computers (blogging, Twitter, social networks, viral video, live feeds),
    - theories focused on the relationship between computers and culture,
    - uses of computers in particular contexts and the impacts thereof (computers and pedagogy, online literary journals),
    - the relationship between computers and cultural forces (such as news, politics, and terrorism),
    - security/privacy/fraud and computers (online security issues, spam, scams, and hoaxes),
    - and others.
    
    While we will consider any relevant paper, we have a preference for those that involve transferable methodological approaches. This is an interdisciplinary conference, and other conference attendees would benefit from being able to adapt your research methods to their future research.
    
    Scholars, teachers, professionals, artists, and others interested in computer culture are encouraged to participate.
    
    Graduate students are also particularly welcome with award opportunities for best graduate papers. More information about awards can be found at
    http://www.swtxpca.org/documents/48.html
    Specifically, we would like to highlight the following award opportunities:
    The "Computer Culture and Game Studies Award" :
    http://www.swtxpca.org/documents/112.html#ComputerCultureAward_Bookmark
    The "Heldrich-Dvorak Travel Fellowship" :
    http://www.swtxpca.org/documents/113.html
    Given how papers may often fall into multiple categories, there may be other award opportunities listed at
    http://www.swtxpca.org/documents/112.html
    which would be appropriate for your paper.  (However, each presenter may only apply for one.)
    
    If you wish to form your own panel, we would be glad to facilitate your needs.
    
    Please pass along this call to friends and colleagues.
    
    For early consideration, submit 100-200 word abstracts and proposals for panels by 16 November 2012 to the conference electronic submission system which can be found at:
    http://conference2013.swtxpca.org/

    If you have any questions, contact the Computer Culture area co-chairs,
    Andrew Chen (andrewsw@gmail.com) and Joseph Chaney (jchaney@iusb.edu).

Position Announcement in Cultural Studies

Job Title: 	Tenure-Track Assistant Professor of Interdisciplinary Cultural Studies  Job ID: 	100487  		  About Columbia  Columbia College Chicago is an urban institution of over 10,000 undergraduate and graduate students emphasizing arts, media, and communications in a liberal arts setting.    HHSS Department contributes significantly to Columbia College Chicago's Liberal Arts and Sciences Core Curriculum, serving every student in every major throughout the college with coursework in the humanities, history, languages, and social sciences.  The Department offers a B.A. in Cultural Studies, as well as minors in Black World Studies, Cultural Studies, Latino and Latin American Studies, and Women's and Gender Studies.   _______________________________________________________________________________  Job Summary  The Department of Humanities, History, and Social Sciences (HHSS) at Columbia College Chicago invites applications for a tenure-track assistant professor position in Cultural Studies, starting Fall 2013.  The successful candidate should be an interdisciplinary scholar with a background in Cultural Studies, with research and teaching interests in any of the following: new media, science and technology, environmental, and urban studies, and/or cultural theories.  The successful candidate will also contribute to teaching in one or more of the departmental areas serving the LAS Core Curriculum.     Responsibilities include: full-time undergraduate teaching load (3/3), including cultural studies courses at all levels; scholarship and professional activity; student advising; and service to the college and community.  _______________________________________________________________________________  Minimum Education & Experience  A Ph.D. in a relevant area(s) of expertise is required at time of hire.  Candidates must have teaching experience at the undergraduate level and demonstrate teaching effectiveness, a willingness to work with undergraduates in a liberal arts setting, and have a record of scholarly accomplishment or promise.   _______________________________________________________________________________  How To Apply    IMPORTANT:  At the start of the online application please upload ONE document that combines your cover letter, a curriculum vitae with the names of at least 3 references and a statement of teaching philosophy.  Do not upload each document separately. The title of your document should be less than 60 characters and saved as a word.doc, word.dox, or PDF. Complete the online application including adding the names and contact information for three professional references. You will receive an email confirmation once you have successfully submitted your application.  Review of applications will begin on November 30, 2012.    Visit www.colum.edu/EmploymentServices for application guidelines. If you experience technical difficulties please email careers@colum.edu.  No phone calls or hard copy materials.  _______________________________________________________________________________  Equal Employment Opportunity  Columbia College Chicago encourages qualified female, LGBTQ, disabled, and minority individuals to apply for all positions.    More info about the Cultural Studies Program at Columbia College can be found here: colum.edu/culturalstudies

CFP 2013 Rutgers Media Studies Conference: Extending Play - December 1st Deadline

CFP: 2013 Rutgers Media Studies Conference: Extending Play    Can we still define play as an organizing principle in today’s  technologically mediated world?    Play can be hard work and serious business, and it’s time to push beyond  the conceptualization of play as merely the pursuit of leisure and  consider how the issues of power, affect, labor, identity, and privacy  surround the idea and practice of play. The Rutgers Media Studies  Conference: Extending Play invites submissions that seek to understand  play as a mediating practice, and how play operates at the center of all  media.    We are interested in all approaches to the traditions, roles, and contexts  of play, and hope to explore how play can be broadly defined and  incorporated as a fundamental principle extending into far-flung and  unexpected arenas. Johan Huizinga characterizes man as the species that  plays: “Law and order, commerce and profit, craft and art, poetry, wisdom  and science. All are rooted in the primaeval soil of play” (Homo Ludens,  p.5). How does play operate as a civilizing function — or is it perhaps a  technology that produces order?    Play is a means of exploring and joining various disciplines: Social  media, mash-ups, and blogs have altered how we communicate and create;  game design has influenced how businesses relate to consumers; citizen  journalists have shifted the role of the professional in mediating  information and forging a public sphere.    To explore these questions, we invite scholars, students, tinkerers,  visionaries, and players to the first ever Rutgers Media Studies  Conference: Extending Play, to be held April 19th and 20th, 2013 on the  Rutgers University campus in New Brunswick, NJ. Confirmed speakers for our  keynote conversations include Fred Turner (Stanford University) & Stephen  Duncombe (New York University) and Trevor Pinch (Cornell University) &  Paul D. Miller, aka DJ Spooky (The European Graduate School).    We invite individuals from media studies and related fields in the  humanities and social sciences to participate. Potential topics for paper,  panel, roundtable, and workshop may include, but are not limited to:    -Playing with labor: work-like games and game-like work  -Play as resistance (culture jamming, situationist art, or other contexts)  -Gendering (and gendered) play  -Music and performance  -Linguistic play  -Play and social media  -Playing with identity  -Love and play (flirtation, AI relationships, robotica, etc)  -Gamification and games in nontraditional settings  -Transgression, cheating, and “gaming” systems  -Darker side of play (trolling, gambling, or corruption)  -Game studies    The Rutgers Media Studies Conference: Extending Play promises to offer a  memorable meeting of scholarship, and to that end, we are looking to play  with standard conference conventions. One track throughout the conference  will be a series of public workshop sessions in which scholars and  practitioners will host roundtable discussions on contemporary issues that  bring together an audience of experts and interested parties. In the  academic panel track, each presenter will have a maximum of 15 minutes to  offer his or her ideas as a presentation or interactive conversation, and  will choose one of the following methods of presentation:     –material accompaniment (hand out a zine, scrapbook, postcard series, etc)   –performance (spoken word, song, verse, dance, recording, etc)   –limited visuals (a maximum of 3 slides and 25 total words)   –game (create rules and incorporate audience play)  For additional ideas on how to play with media, play with time, or play  with space during your presentation, visit our website at  mediacon.rutgers.edu.    The deadline for proposals is Saturday, December 1, 2012. We invite  individual proposals, full panel proposals (of four members), and  proposals for roundtable and workshop sessions. Please email an abstract  of approximately 247 words, along with your name, affiliation,  presentation method, and a short biography to mediacon@rutgers.edu. If you  are interested in proposing a topic for our public workshop track, or are  interested in participating in one, please indicate that as well.  Notifications of acceptance will be sent out by mid-January 2013.  

Tuesday, November 6, 2012

Active Ageing: Delivering Results for Europe

European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing – First Conference of Partners, Brussels



via http://ec.europa.eu/information_society/newsroom/cf/dae/itemdetail.cfm?item_id=8905

Active and healthy ageing: concrete action plans for a better life for older Europeans

The first Conference of Partners of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing takes place in Brussels today. The Conference is headlined by European Commission Vice President Neelie Kroes, Commissioner Maire Geoghegan Quinn, Kathleen Lynch, the Irish Minister of State from the Department of Health and Department of Justice, and the Spanish Secretary General of Health and Consumers, Ministry of Health, Social Services and Equality, María Pilar Farjas Abadía.



via http://ec.europa.eu/information_society/newsroom/cf/dae/itemdetail.cfm?item_id=8904

CFP: Sports-Media-Military Nexus

CALL FOR PROPOSALS

"Sports - Media - Military Nexus," Teaching Media 1(2): 2012.

Teaching Media is dedicated to promoting a collaborative exchange and dialogue between media studies scholars about contemporary approaches to teaching and critically engaging with multi-modal media.

Call for Proposals:
Since September 11, 2001 sports has become increasingly "complicit" in an increasing militarization of U.S. society and popular culture. Butterworth and Moskal (2009), for example, argue that American identity is constituted in and by a culture of militarism, "wherein Americans are implicated in a structural relationship between government, the military, and entertainment industries to the extent that it has become functionally impossible to live outside the rhetorical production of war" (p. 413). The "seizing" of the NFL, Major League Baseball, or NASCAR by the military can be witnessed frequently through the spreading of militaristic messages from sponsors, advertisers, and broadcasters who appear eager to use these sporting events to garner support for war, especially during a time of great unpopularity among the American public, and to reassert national identity through excessive displays of patriotism.

Teaching Media seeks teaching materials and models for understanding the relations between sports, media, and the military. Approaches to teaching the sports-media-military nexus can include, but are not limited to:
  • the role of the media in mediating militaristic sporting events
  • the intersection of gender, race, and sexuality and the military-sport-media nexus
  • the links between the (in)visibility of women and queer subjects in mediated sports to the military as a traditionally hetero-patriarchal institution
  • socio-political issues raised concerning the militarization and securitization of the 2012 London Olympics
  • the entanglements between the neoliberal state and the military-sports-media nexus
  • the effects of globalization on professional sports and the military

Teaching Media seeks 250-word summaries of teaching materials and models from a variety of pedagogical perspectives. The summary should include your general framework, a list of teaching materials and/or assignments in the unit, and a short explanation of why your approach is innovative. Please email all submissions, either as a word or PDF document, to teachingmedia.contact@gmail.com. The Teaching Media editorial board will choose three summaries and ask the submitters to expand upon their abstract as part of a curated space on our site. Those not chosen are encouraged to submit their materials to our common space.

SUBMISSION DEADLINE: Sunday November 18, 2012

As we hope for continuing discussions and exchange as well as contributions to Teaching Media we encourage you to visit our website at http://www.teachingmedia.org/

Feminist Media Studies Commentary & Criticism CFP - Fifty Shades of Grey and "Mommy Porn"

FEMINIST MEDIA STUDIES  Commentary & Criticism Section Call for Papers  Fifty Shades of Grey and "Mommy Porn"     Since its publication in 2011, the Fifty Shades of Grey erotic trilogy has not only topped best-seller lists around the world, but also sparked a range of reactions. From those who loved the series and the emotional connection between the two main characters to those who criticized it, the series has raised a number of debates such as how healthy or "normal" are BDSM relationships; to what extent is domestic violence glamourized; and to what extent does the series take into account feminism? Since its release and its viral popularity, a series of other competing publications have also since emerged, proof that this new wave of "mommy porn" has gone mainstream.  This literature is juxtaposed with and through various dialogues about the state of feminism in contemporary culture, including Kaity Roiphe's lead story in Newsweek of April, 2012 titled 'The Fantasy Life of Working Women'.       In light of the recent plethora of erotic publishing, and the range of debates it has sparked, this issue of Commentary and Criticism invites short papers that respond and discuss various controversies raised by Fifty Shades of Grey or other erotic fiction, through a feminist media studies framework.       Essays of 1500-2000 words are due by Friday 1st February and should be emailed to Kumi Silva at kumi@email.unc.edu and Kaitlynn Mendes at kmendes@dmu.ac.uk. Please do not submit manuscripts through the Feminist Media Studies website.     Submission guidelines can be found at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/journal.asp?issn=1468-0777&linktype=44        BOOKS TO REVIEW  Potential contributors can write to the co-editors, Kaitlynn Mendes (kmendes@dmu.ac.uk) and Kumarini Silva (kumi@email.unc.edu) to express preliminary interest in doing a review on one of the following books. Reviews should be around 800 words and deadlines will be negotiated with the editors.        Kim, Youna (2012) Women and the Media in Asia: The Precarious Self, Palgrave, Basingstoke.     To what extent do women have control over their lives? How do the media intersect with imagining different lives for women? This book is concerned with the changing lives of women; the troubling signs of female individualization as intersected with everyday media culture - a new arena of anxiety for women in contemporary Asia.       Iquani, Mehita (2012) Consumer Culture and the Media, Palgrave, Basingstoke     Consumer culture is synonymous with westernised societies. How did this particular ethic come to achieve so much success? This book argues that one reason is the seductive way in which it is promoted through the media. To demonstrate this, the book provides a detailed analysis of the case study of consumer magazine covers and argues that the ways magazines are displayed and sold in retail spaces, the literal glossiness of the texts, and the intertwined messages about sexiness, commodities and self-identity communicated by them combine to create a powerful and seductive advertisement for consumer culture. These strategies are not taken for granted, but questioned and put into the context of bigger scholarly debates about 'the public', 'power' and identity in neoliberal societies.       McLaughlin, Lisa and Carter, Cynthia (2012) Current Perspectives in Feminist Media Studies, Routledge, London.     Current Perspectives in Feminist Media Studies features contributions written by a diverse group of stellar feminist scholars from around the world. Each contributor has authored a brief, thought-provoking commentary on the current status and future directions of feminist media studies. Although contributors write about numerous, discrete subjects within the field of feminist media studies, their various ideas and concerns can be merged into six broad, overlapping subject areas that allow us to gain a strong sense of the expansive contours of current feminist communication scholarship and activism which the authors have identified as generally illustrative of the field. Specifically, authors encourage feminist media scholars to engage with issues of political economy, new ICTs and cybercultures as well as digital media policy, media and identity, sexuality and sexualisation, and postfeminism. They stress that feminist media scholars must broaden and deepen our theoretical frameworks   and methodologies so as to provide a better sense of the conceptual complexities of feminist media studies and empirical realities of contemporary media forms, practices and audiences.        Al-Malki, Amal, Kaufer, David, Ishizaki, Suygury & Dreher, Kira (2012) Arab Women in Arab News: Old Stereotypes and New Media, Bloomsbury, USA     Arab Women in Arab News is a book that moves beyond the typical portrayal of victimized and silenced Arab women in the western press. It instead presents a more balanced portrayal of Arab women in Arab news, actively engaged in community and family, sometimes empowered, sometimes oppressed, and sometimes experiencing and confronting both conditions at once in their daily lives. The authors' findings paint a group portrait of Arab women in Arab news as more active than passive. The authors also present individualized portraits of Arab women found in Arab print, portraits that reveal in intimate detail their lives, triumphs, and struggles. The lives of these women in the news are presented to the reader in novelesque detail.          Tasha N. Dubriwny (2012) The Vulnerable Empowered Woman: Feminism, Postfeminism, and Women's Health.  Rutgers University Press, USA     The Vulnerable Empowered Woman  assesses the state of women's healthcare today by analyzing popular media representations-television, print newspapers, websites, advertisements, blogs, and memoirs-in order to understand the ways in which breast cancer, postpartum depression, and cervical cancer are discussed in American public life. From narratives about prophylactic mastectomies to young girls receiving a vaccine for sexually transmitted disease, the representations of women's health today form a single restrictive identity: the vulnerable empowered woman. This identity defuses feminist notions of collective empowerment and social change by drawing from both postfeminist and neoliberal ideologies. The woman is vulnerable because of her very femininity and is empowered not to change the world, but to choose from among a limited set of medical treatments.  

Monday, November 5, 2012

Call for Papers: New Economies of Death: The Commodification of Dying, the Dead Body, and Bereavement

Call for Papers: New Economies of Death: The Commodification of Dying, the Dead Body, and Bereavement


Centre for Death and Society Conference 2013


29-30 June 2013, Bath Royal Literary & Scientific Institute, Bath, United Kingdom


CALL FOR PAPERS

The 2013 CDAS conference will explore the constantly evolving relationship between commodification and human death. We are interested in papers and presentations that examine the commodity values (real, speculative, historical, and contemporary) attached to the following themes:


Physical and conceptual understandings of death


The dying process and care of the dying


Tissue Economies (Waldby and Mitchell, etc.) and the buying and selling of dead bodies, body parts and tissues


Cultural resistance to commodification in the market for human goods


Dead body donation for medical schools and anatomical research; the gift relationship


Organ markets, both government operated and blackmarket


Consumer costs for funerals, dying, and memorialisation


New critiques of capitalism and its relationship to death and dying as forms of labour


Future postmortem economies built around life extension


The capitalisation of digital spaces for memorialisation


The commodification of social networks, both real world and digital, that deal with death


Postmortem digital property rights and the next-of-kin relation


The Multitude (as discussed by Negri, Hardt, Casarino, etc.) as composed of both living and dead bodies


The aesthetic commodification of death, dying, and the dead body in film, literature, architecture, etc.


Media commodification of death and dying in television, print, and online


Political economies built around end of life care and the politics of death


Grief and bereavement as commodifiable human activities


Our aim is to bring together the fragmented research and knowledge in this area.


Twenty-minute multidisciplinary papers are invited from social scientists and death studies researchers; scholars of culture, media and literature; bioethicists; economists; historians; health and care professionals; computer scientists; consumer advocates; funeral directors; and members of all relevant industries. Abstracts (up to 250 words) to be emailed to cdas@bath.ac.uk by 11 March 2013.


Caron Staley

Centre for Death & Society

Department of Social & Policy Sciences

Univeristy of Bath

Bath

BA2 7AY

Tel: 01225 386949

Email: cdas@bath.ac.uk

Visit the website at http://www.bath.ac.uk/cdas/index.html


CFP for special issue on Internet Memes for Journal of Visual Culture

Call for Submissions: Internet Memes and Visual Culture
A themed Special Issue of Journal of Visual Culture

Issue Guest Editors: Laine Nooney (Stony Brook University) and Laura Portwood-Stacer (New York University)

 
The Editors are currently seeking proposed contributions for a Special Issue of the Journal of Visual Culture on Internet Memes and Visual Culture, to be published December 2014. The term meme, a portmanteau of mimesis and gene, was minted in 1976 by British ethologist and evolutionary biologist Richard Dawkins. Dawkins proposed the meme as a "unit of cultural transmission," a self-perpetuating cultural phenomenon analogous to the gene as a replicator of biological data. Almost 40 years later, the term "meme" has become the coin of the realm within Internet subcultures, particularly on microblogging and social network platforms. In these contexts the designation "meme" identifies digital objects that riff on a given visual, textual or auditory form. For a digital object to become a meme, it must be appropriated, re-coded, and slotted back into the Internet infrastructures it came from—memes require continued user adaptation. Thus, memes are co-constitutive with the user practices of creative (re)production that are default modes of communicative interaction on major social media platforms such as Facebook, Tumblr, Reddit, Twitter, Pinterest, and YouTube. Memes are frequent objects of analysis among scholars of contemporary digital culture, socio-linguistics, fan culture, and social networking, wherein they are assessed as forms of generative vernacular communication and art-making that defy traditional models of top-down capitalist consumer control of mass media forms. Yet the speed, volume and insularity of meme-making often frustrates aesthetic, formal and techno-infrastructural scholarship on memes and meme distribution.

 

This special issue of the Journal of Visual Culture will organize a conversation among cultural scholars, artists, activists, journalists and Internet content producers regarding the social, historical, and aesthetic significance of Internet memes. Our move to "take memes seriously" as communicative and aesthetic objects is especially timely, as memes' linguistic tropes, visual styles and means of transmission gain increasing visibility beyond their origins in online subcultural spaces such as 4chan or 9gag. One of the ways this special issue will take on these questions is by itself expanding on traditional modes of academic writing. Potential contributors are thus encouraged to incorporate visual and conceptual experiments intended to elucidate the meme form, performatively and materially replicating the phenomenon under study.

 

The Editors are open to engagements with "Visual Culture" broadly writ. Contributions may consider the following topics or expand on other ideas, keeping a particular emphasis on relating memes to the visual:

 

ñ how memes figure in a broader history of performative, humor-based, conceptualist, retro, or contemporary digital art practices

ñ the formal aesthetics of different meme types and the technological infrastructures that undergird them (300x300 macros, supercuts, GIFs, screengrabs, photobombs, snowclones, etc.)

ñ meme production in non-Western locations (particularly as they may be tied to political risk or Internet censorship)

ñ meme transmission across national and cultural borders

ñ how (if?) memes have enabled creative producers (particularly queer people and people of color) to contest presumptions of homogenous Western whiteness on the Internet

ñ how memes have served as vehicles for political protest and resistance

 

Proposed contributions may take the form of scholarly articles (5000-7000 words), but the Editors are particularly interested in shorter essays, graphic essays, and other creative formats. We especially encourage submissions in formats that can be showcased on the Journal of Visual Culture's blog and a Tumblr devoted to this special issue.

 

For a proposed academic paper, please email a single-spaced, extended abstract of 1000-1200 words that details a projected argument and possible example cases to be examined. Please also include a brief list of scholarly sources that will inform your paper (not included in the word count). For a proposed contribution in another formats (short essay, graphic essay, conceptual piece, etc.), please email a single-spaced description or artist statement that details the format and projected content of the submission. The deadline for submission of proposals/abstracts is 15 January 2013. The Editors expect to make final decisions about accepted contributions by mid-March 2013. Accepted contributors will be asked to submit their full contributions by January 2014. The Editors are aware of and open to shifts in content that may occur as the full submission develops, should the proposed contribution be accepted for inclusion in the issue.

 

Inquiries and submission proposals should be directed to both Laine Nooney (laine.nooney@gmail.com) and Laura Portwood-Stacer (lportwoodstacer@gmail.com). Emails should include the subject heading: Internet Memes special issue, JVC.

Download CFP as pdf: http://www.lauraportwoodstacer.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/JVCmemes_cfp2.pdf

Call for Proposals - New Book Series

Call for Proposals

Contemporary American Literature

A New Book Series from Scarecrow Press (Imprint of Rowman & Littlefield)

Series Editor: Bob Batchelor

The Scarecrow Press Contemporary American Literature Series is currently accepting proposals for volumes focused on how American literature reflects and shapes our knowledge of our cultural, historical, and socio-economic worlds. In an age when "literature" now encompasses everything from multi-modal texts to timeless classics in the canon, the time is ripe for assessing, reassessing, and refocusing our gaze on the centrality of literature and the literary life in the contemporary world. 

The Contemporary American Literature Series seeks to include single-author, co-author, and edited volumes that address the concerns listed above. The Series Editor also hopes to receive proposals that add to our current understanding of literature's venerable titans, as well as rising stars on the literary scene. This new series intends to demonstrate literature's enduring importance, while simultaneously providing innovative perspectives that will illuminate, inspire, and transcend literary and cultural analysis and criticism. 

Volumes in the series will typically run between 80,000 – 110,000 words, exclusive of notes, bibliography, and index. Authors and editors are responsible for negotiating and securing their own permissions for use of images, illustrations, and other copyrighted material. 

Proposals should include a discussion of the volume's significance, its relationship to existing scholarly literature, intended readership, a proposed table of contents, estimated length, number of images, and projected timeline for completion, along with the author/editor's CV. For more information, please see the Scarecrow proposal guidelines at: https://rowman.com/Page/AuthRes

Inquiries and proposals may be directed to the Series Editor, Bob Batchelor at rpbatche@kent.edu or to Scarecrow's Senior Editor of Arts and Literature, Stephen Ryan at sryan@scarecrowpress.com.