Saturday, May 11, 2013

Call for Chapters: Cloud Computing Applications for Quality Health Care Delivery

Call for Chapters: Cloud Computing Applications for Quality Health Care Delivery


Editors


Dr. Anastasius Moumtzoglou (“P. & A. Kyriakou” Children’s Hospital, President of the Hellenic Society for Quality & Safety in Healthcare, Greece);


Dr. Anastasia Kastania (Athens University of Economics and Business, Greece)


Proposals Submission Deadline: May 30, 2013


Full Chapters Due: August 30, 2013


Submission Date: November 30, 2013


For release in the Advances in Medical Technologies and Clinical Practice (AMTCP) Book Series


The Internet, having its roots in telephony applications in the early 1990s, is often referred to as “The Cloud.” By the turn of the millennium, the Internet was referred to as broadband, and the term “in the cloud” was highly desired. Telephone utilities were investing in “The Cloud” for switching and routing the appropriate connections for phone calls, faxes, live feeds, and signals. Then, around the middle of the decade, Computational Cloud Services, called “Cloud Computing,” was firmly in the vocabulary as a way to describe what the user was doing: accessing computing services in the cloud.


At the beginning of the decade, companies began building their websites in such a way that users could utilize their services exclusively through the use of a browser. Shortly, through the use of more powerful technologies, “in the cloud” applications became commonplace. By the middle of the decade, most leading corporations with a strong Web presence had reasonable and reliable operation of their services exclusively “in the cloud.”


The “Cloud” represents a fundamental change in the use of IT services, which involves a shift from owning and managing the IT system to accessing IT systems as a service. The term Cloud Services, a distinct terminology from outsourced IT hosting, comes from the fact that the Internet has often been depicted as a “Cloud.” Cloud Services have been defined as the services that meet the following criteria:


Consumers neither own the hardware on which data processing and storage happens, nor the software that performs the data processing.

Consumers have the ability to access and use the service at any time over the Internet.

As a result, the definition of Cloud Services is twofold. The first part pertains to the ownership of the actual hardware and software that is used to perform data storage and data processing, while the second part refers to the client’s ability to access the service remotely when it needs to use it.


On the other hand, as definitions evolved, Cloud Computing denoted the influence of cloud, and implied the user experience moving away from personal computers to a “cloud” of computers. In this context, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) defined Cloud Computing as “a model for enabling ubiquitous, convenient, on-demand network access to a shared pool of configurable computing resources (e.g., networks, servers, storage, applications, and services) that can be rapidly provisioned and released with minimal management effort or service provider interaction”. This cloud model is composed of five essential characteristics, three service models, and four deployment models. Essential characteristics, according to NIST, include on-demand self-service, broad network access, resource pooling, rapid elasticity, and measured service. Service Models include Software as a Service (SaaS), Platform as a Service (PaaS), and Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS), while deployment models include the Private cloud, the Community cloud, the Public cloud, and the Hybrid cloud.


Moreover, the research firm IDC described Cloud Computing as “an emerging IT development, deployment and distribution model, enabling real-time delivery of products, services and solutions over the Internet.” It also defined Cloud Services as “Consumer and Business products, services and solutions that are delivered and consumed in real-time over the Internet.” Finally, analyst firm Gartner defined Cloud Computing as “a model of computing in which scalable and flexible IT-enabled capabilities are delivered as a service to external customers using Internet technologies.”


As far as healthcare is concerned, the trend appears to be irreversible. Software applications and information once in the realm of a local computer or a local server are now in the sphere of the public Internet. Private health information once confined to local networks is migrating onto the Internet. Patients voluntarily grant access to their health records, while the collection and management of this data is entirely legal. Microsoft and Google are two notable examples of companies following the accelerating likelihood of placing, once restricted and private health records, “in the cloud.” Their initiatives hold the attention timing and force convergence of events if we consider the “Transforming Healthcare Through IT” and “Enabling Healthcare Reform Using Information Technology” initiatives.


Objective of the Book


The book will provide an overview of cloud technologies that might affect quality in healthcare. The proposed book intends to provide a compendium of terms, definitions, and explanations of concepts, processes, and acronyms. Additionally, it will present chapters (each chapter consisting of 7,000-10,000 words) authored by leading experts, offering an in-depth description of key terms and concepts related to the demystification of healthcare quality in the Cloud.


Target Audience


The prospective audience includes undergraduate and extended degree programs students, graduate students of health care quality and health services management, executive education and continuing education, health care managers and health professionals.


Recommended topics include, but are not limited to, the following:


Healthcare Cloud computing and Web Services


Definition, features and types of cloud services in healthcare


Adoption of cloud services and quality in healthcare


Benefits and drawbacks of cloud services in healthcare


Cloud technologies and quality in healthcare


Cloud-based systems for healthcare information technology and quality in healthcare


Cloud Perspective for HIPAA and HITECH


Interoperability


Privacy in Healthcare Cloud Computing


High Performance Computing in the Healthcare Cloud


Information Assurance and Security in Cloud Computing


Characteristics of Cloud-based Healthcare Organisations Cloud-based EMRs and quality in healthcare


Cloud-based medical practice management applications and quality in healthcare


Cloud-based patient portals and quality in healthcare


Cloud-based ePrescription systems and quality in healthcare


Cloud-based Laboratory solutions and quality in healthcare


Mobile Cloud Computing and quality in healthcare


Mobile Multimedia-Cloud Computing


Cloud healthcare simulation


Autonomic Clouds in Healthcare


Submission Procedure


Researchers and practitioners are invited to submit on or before May 30, 2013, a 2-3 page chapter proposal clearly explaining the mission and concerns of his or her proposed chapter. Authors of accepted proposals will be notified by June 15, 2013 about the status of their proposals and sent chapter guidelines. Full chapters are expected to be submitted by August 30, 2013. All submitted chapters will be reviewed on a double-blind review basis. Contributors may also be requested to serve as reviewers for this project.


Publisher


This book is scheduled to be published by IGI Global (formerly Idea Group Inc.), publisher of the “Information Science Reference” (formerly Idea Group Reference), “Medical Information Science Reference” and “IGI Publishing” imprints. For additional information regarding the publisher, please visit www.igi-global.com. This publication is anticipated to be released in 2014.


Important Dates:


May 30, 2013: Proposal Submission Deadline


June 15, 2013: Notification of Acceptance


August 30, 2013: Full Chapter Submission


October 30, 2013: Review Results Returned


November 30, 2013: Final Chapter Submission


February 15, 2014: Final deadline


Editorial Advisory Board


Vahe A. Kazandjian, Johns Hopkins University, USA


Dimitris Koutsouris, National Technical University of Athens, Greece


Athina Lazakidou, University of Peloponnese, Greece


Ales Bourek, Masaryk University, Czech Republic


Kathleen Abrahamson, Purdue University, USA


George Bohoris, University of Piraeus, Greece


Inquiries and submissions can be forwarded electronically (Word document):


Dr. Anastasius Moumtzoglou

“P. & A. Kyriakou” Children’s Hospital

Thivon & Levadias, 11527 Athens, Greece

Tel.: +302132009822 • GSM: +306974558870

E-mail: anas1@hol.gr


Dr. Anastasia Kastania

Athens University of Economis and Business

Patission 76 Str, 10434 Athens, Greece

Tel: +30-210-8203158, Fax: +30-210-8203157, GSM: +306944546208

E-mail: ank@aueb.gr


Call for Chapters: High Performance and Cloud Computing in Scientific Research and Education

Call for Chapters: High Performance and Cloud Computing in Scientific Research and Education


Editors


Dr. Marijana Despotovic-Zrakic (University of Belgrade, Serbia)


Dr. Veljko Milutinovic (University of Belgrade, Serbia)


Dr. Aleksandar Belic (University of Belgrade, Serbia)


Proposals Submission Deadline: June 15, 2013


Full Chapters Due: July 15, 2013


Submission Date: September 30, 2013


Nowadays, requirements for design and implementation of information systems that are used for educational and research purposes at universities become more complex. These information systems include a plethora of services, applications, resources, and interactions. The resulting conglomerate of services and solutions is getting increasingly difficult to deal with and further improve. In addition to that, new and extremely important concepts, such as mobility, pervasiveness, and services on demand, have further fuelled the need for changing and improving existing approaches. As a result, efforts to design a new computing architecture--the so called cloud computing--have been initiated over the last couple of years and are ongoing across the world. New paradigms such as high performance computing and cloud computing will provide reliable and cost effective IT infrastructure that enhance realization of research and educational processes at universities.


The main subject of the book is high performance computing and cloud computing applications in the area of scientific work and education. Supercomputers are used for compute-intensive tasks such as problems including quantum physics, weather forecasting, climate research, oil and gas exploration, molecular modeling (computing the structures and properties of chemical compounds, biological macromolecules, polymers, and crystals), and physical simulations (such as simulation of airplanes in wind tunnels, simulation of the detonation of nuclear weapons, and research in nuclear fusion). In the scope of this publication, the following areas of high computing application were discussed and presented through case studies and exercises: industry, research and academic community works, simulation, and hydroinformatics. Cloud computing is an emerging area that includes a set of disciplines, technologies, and business models used to deliver IT capabilities (software, platforms, hardware) as an on-demand, scalable, elastic service. This book presents the applications of cloud computing in scientific research, education, e-learning, ubiquitous learning, CRM and social computing.


Objective of the Book


The primary goal of the proposed publication is to provide a variety of research and survey articles in the field of modern computer technologies and their application in science and education. Findings and discussion provided within publication should foster the potentials and capabilities of research, the academic community, and also industry. The publication is oriented towards making an impact in practice. A loy research presented in the publication will leverage dissemination of knowledge and awareness of the potential benefits of cloud computing.


Target Audience


The publication research provides numerous examples, practical solutions, and applications of high performance computing and cloud computing that can improve capacity and capability as well as the quality of research, teaching, and learning processes. This publication can contribute to the seamless adoption of modern technologies in the areas of science, research, and business; it can also foster new IT infrastructures and services, enable efficient and cost-effective usage of software and hardware resources, and determine what is of significant importance for each business entity, particularly in developing countries. In addition, the presented works are expected to contribute to introducing cloud computing and high performance application and services in other areas (business, industry). Guidelines and case studies provided in the book can help developing cost effective solutions in business and industry. This manuscript is also beneficial to computer and system infrastructure designers, developers, business managers, entrepreneurs, and investors within the cloud computing related industry. The target audience of this book will be composed of professionals and researchers working in the field of information and communication technologies, and their applications in science and education. Researchers and scholars will gain insight on how modern technologies can be used as a support for scientific research. The book will also provide resources on how cloud technologies can be used to build effective infrastructure of educational institutions.


Recommended topics include, but are not limited to, the following:


1. High performance computing:


High performance computer architectures and technologies


Grid computing


Parallel and distributed algorithms


Scalable servers and systems


Energy efficient high-performance computing


Software support and advanced micro-architecture techniques


Operating systems for scalable high-performance computing


High performance computing in science


Emerging applications such as biotechnology and nanotechnology


2. Cloud computing concepts and architecture:


Cloud architecture


Virtualization


Transition from traditional high performance architecture to cloud architecture


IaaS, PaaS, SaaS


Middlewares for implementing clouds


Development and applications of cloud concepts


Autonomic cloud management


Security issues and risk management in cloud environments


3. Cloud computing in science:


Synergy between grid computing and cloud computing in science


Synergy between ubiquitous computing and cloud computing in science


Synergy between pervasive computing and cloud computing in science


Cloud computing in specific scientific domains


Cloud services as support to scientific research


GIS and cloud technologies


4. Cloud computing in education:


Cloud architecture for e-education


Allocation and resource management


Federation of university clouds


Digital identity management in the cloud


Cloud services as support to education


Knowledge management in the cloud


5. Applications and projects


Submission Procedure


Researchers and practitioners are invited to submit on or before June 15, 2013, a 2-3 page chapter proposal clearly explaining the mission and concerns of his or her proposed chapter. Authors of accepted proposals will be notified by June 30, 2013 about the status of their proposals and sent chapter guidelines. Full chapters are expected to be submitted by July 15, 2013. All submitted chapters will be reviewed on a double-blind review basis. Contributors may also be requested to serve as reviewers for this project. For additional information regarding the manuscript, please visit www.elab.rs/cc-book/.


Publisher


This book is scheduled to be published by IGI Global (formerly Idea Group Inc.), publisher of the “Information Science Reference” (formerly Idea Group Reference), “Medical Information Science Reference,” “Business Science Reference,” and “Engineering Science Reference” imprints. For additional information regarding the publisher, please visit www.igi-global.com. This book is anticipated to be released in 2013.


Important Dates


June 15, 2013: Proposal Submission Deadline


June 30, 2013: Notification of Acceptance


July 15, 2013: Full Chapter Submission


August 15, 2013: Review Results Returned


September 30, 2013: Final Chapter Submission


November 30, 2013: Final Deadline


Editorial Advisory Board Members:


Borko Furth, Florida Atlantic University, USA


Ivan Stojmenovic, University of Ottawa, Canada


Vladimir Brusic, Boston University, USA


Milorad Stanojevic, University of Belgrade, Serbia


Srdan Krco, Ericsson Ireland Research Centre, Ireland


Inquiries and submissions can be forwarded electronically (Word document):


Dr. Marijana Despotović-Zrakić

Faculty of Organizational Science

University of Belgrade, Jove Illića 154

Tel.: +381698893144


Wednesday, May 8, 2013

Call for Submissions for a Special Issue of Methods of Information in Medicine Journal: Managing Interoperability and compleXity in Health Systems

Call for Submissions for a Special Issue of Methods of Information in Medicine Journal: Managing Interoperability and compleXity in Health Systems


We are inviting submissions for an issue of the Methods of Information in Medicine devoted to the latest advances in bio-medical and e-health knowledge and information management research. The recent large-scale deployment of Electronic Health Records (EHR) across medical institutions provides new opportunities of secondary use of EHR. Issues of data-mining in large heterogeneous clinical data-sets, information retrieval and extraction in multiple medical repositories, the management of complexity and the coherent update of knowledge in medicine, clinical standards interoperability in distributed health systems and the patient Electronic Health Record (EHR) are now becoming critical to implementing enterprise and nationwide health systems.


Topic of interest will include but not limited to:


1. Data Mining, Information Extraction, and Semantic Annotation of EHR Data;


2. Medical Knowledge Representation and Reasoning


3. Expert and Clinical Decision Support Systems Using Semantic Web Technologies


4. Interoperability in Distributed healthcare Systems


5.Clinical Information Standards (e.g. HL7) Clinical Terminologies, Classifications (e.g. ICD 10) and biomedical ontologies (e.g. SNOMED - CT)


6. Patient Cohort Identification


7. Personalized Medicine via high throughput data integration


Important Dates


June 1, 2013 Letter of Intent Due (optional)


June 15, 2013 Submission Deadline


Peer-review Process


All submitted papers will go through a rigorous peer-review process with at least three reviewers. All submissions should follow the guidelines for authors available at the Methods of Information in Medicine web site (http://www.schattauer.de/fileadmin/assets/zeitschriften/methods/Instruction_to_Authors.pdf). The journal's editorial policy is also outlined on that page and will be strictly followed by special issue reviewers.


Submission Process


Optional letters of intent should be sent to guest editors by June 1, 2013. This will assist in assessing the number of likely submissions and in planning for the review process when papers are submitted. Authors must submit their papers via


http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/methods. Please select “Original Article for a Focus Theme” as manuscript type and mention MIXHS as the Focus Theme in the cover letter.


Page limit is 5 pages in print per article (i.e., about 22,000 characters including space bars, please deduct 1,500 characters including space bars for each figure or table)."


Guest Editors

Matt-Mouley Bouamrane (University of Glasgow, UK)


Cui Tao (Mayo Clinic, USA)


Find out who is coming to eHealth Week 2013

As the date for this year's event draws closer, the world's leaders in health IT are committed to attending eHealth Week. It's not surprising, as this year's conference offers one of the best eHealth learning programmes on the planet.



via http://ec.europa.eu/information_society/newsroom/cf/dae/itemdetail.cfm?item_id=10517

ICT 2013 - Registration open

More than 4000 researchers, innovators, entrepreneurs, industry representatives, young people and politicians are expected in Vilnius. Registration for the event has just been opened.



via http://ec.europa.eu/information_society/newsroom/cf/dae/itemdetail.cfm?item_id=10503

Monday, May 6, 2013

Finalists eHealth competition showcase European eHealth innovation

The EU SME eHealth Competition rewards the best eHealth solution of 2013 produced by a European Small and Medium Enterprise. Meet the finalists.



via http://ec.europa.eu/information_society/newsroom/cf/dae/itemdetail.cfm?item_id=10499

116 in Finland

In Finland, one of the five 116 numbers is currently operational



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116 in the Czech Republic

In the Czech Republic, one of the five 116 numbers is currently operational



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116 in Lithuania

In Lithuania, two of the five 116 numbers are currently operational



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116 in Ireland

In Ireland, three of the five 116 numbers are currently operational



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116 in Sweden

In Sweden, two of the five 116 numbers are currently operational



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116 in the UK

In the UK, three of the five 116 numbers are currently operational



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116 in Slovakia

In Slovakia, two of the five 116 numbers are currently operational



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116 in Slovenia

In Slovenia, three of the five 116 numbers are currently operational



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116 in Romania

In Romania, two of the five 116 numbers are currently operational



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116 in Portugal

In Portugal, three of the five 116 numbers are currently operational



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116 in Poland

In Poland, three of the five 116 numbers are currently operational



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116 in the Netherlands

In the Netherlands, two of the five 116 numbers are currently operational



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116 in Malta

In Malta, two of the five 116 numbers are currently operational



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116 in Latvia

In Latvia, one of the five 116 numbers is currently operational



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116 in Luxembourg

In Luxembourg, two of the five 116 numbers are currently operational



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116 in Italy

In Italy, one of the five 116 numbers is currently operational



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116 in Hungary

In Hungary, three of the five 116 numbers are currently operational



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116 in France

In France, one of the five 116 numbers is currently operational



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116 in Spain

In Spain, one of the five 116 numbers is currently operational



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116 in Greece

In Greece, three of the five 116 numbers are currently operational



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116 in Estonia

In Estonia, two of the five 116 numbers are currently operational



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116 in Denmark

In Denmark, two of the five 116 numbers are currently operational



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116 in Germany

In Germany, all 116 numbers are currently operational



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116 in Cyprus

In Cyprus, two of the five 116 numbers are currently operational



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116 in Bulgaria

In Bulgaria, two of the five 116 numbers are currently operational



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116 in Belgium

In Belgium, one of the five 116 numbers is currently operational



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116 in Austria

In Austria, three of the five 116 numbers are currently operational



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